What It Takes to Get an Online Education

Does one have to posses a special set of skills in order to be
successful in obtaining an online degree or this is something
that everyone can do? By all means, it is quite achievable for
everyone. However, the results will vary drastically. For some,
obtaining an online degree is easier to say than to do. So, what
qualities can be considered as beneficial? These are some of
them:- Being a self starter – Possessing time management skills- Being well organized, prioritizing many different tasks- Able to adjust well to a new reporting system,
programs, and methods of communication.- Able to measure his/her progress at all the times- Establishing rapport with instructor and other students- Submitting work on time, keeping up with schedule- Being result orientedDetermination, good planning and persistence are the
cornerstones of online education. Let’s add another quality to
make four corners: commitment. Determine your goals, make a
plan, stay committed and never give up. Sounds like a formula
for success. It is also a hard work that requires an exceptional
self-discipline.In exchange it offers a great flexibility. It is almost as if
you are managing your education every step at the time. All is
possible and sky is your limit. So use it wisely, enjoy, and
don’t forget to have some fun too.In some respect, being an online student is like being an
entrepreneur. It’s a lot of responsibilities and, you are liable
for everything. The qualities that you acquire during your
online studies are absolutely vital and very unique. It helps
you to build your career, take care of your personal growth, and
successfully take upon yourself different roles that life can
offer.The bottom line is while it takes a lot of effort and
determination to get an online education, it is also builds you
into much stronger person capable of dealing with many life
challenges. It’s definitely a great bonus that any online course
offers for free.

Ground Schools Across the Nation Adopt Online Education Programs

While his two roommates sleep, University of Florida freshman Anish Patel goes to class. But, he only moves from his bed to his desk two feet away to attend his 9:35 economics class. Given the opportunity to either attend class or watch a live stream video over his computer, Patel says he, like many, prefers the latter.The University of Florida is just one brick and mortar school to adopt online education programs. And, it’s not necessarily for student and professor convenience. Instead, with rising student enrollment, ground schools have been forced to address the lack of teaching space. 1,500 undergraduate students are enrolled in Patel’s economics class and with no space large enough to house all of the students- live streams of the class are offered as an alternative.Popular psychology, biology, and statistics classes (among others) are also offered online- and many students say they prefer the online platform to the face-to-face classrooms. University of Florida provost, Joe Glover agrees- “quite honestly, the higher education industry in the United States has not been tremendously effective in the face-to-face mode if you look at national graduation rates. At the very least we should be experimenting with other modes of delivery of education.”The University of Iowa and North Carolina are two other prominent ground schools who have introduced mandatory online courses or other online course options. The University of North Carolina, for instance, requires first year Spanish students to take their language course online.Not only do the online courses allow educators to address growing student enrollment issues and significant education funding cuts, they also ready students for the predominantly digital workplace and provide them with necessary tech skills. Additionally, says Provost Glover, as more and more students turn to the internet for their educational needs, traditional ground schools need to offer students the Web-based learning options that they want. Continual increases in online school enrollment attest to this, says Glover. “We see this as the future of higher education.”